Tag Archives: feature

In Sickness & in Health: Handling Conflict in Marriage and Relationships

From the outside of the slowly spinning white fMRI scanning machine, she looked headless. One at a time, 16 different women laid down, each with the knowledge that if she saw a little red light, she might receive an electric shock to her foot or ankle, or she might not. Sometimes her husband would be beside her to hold her hand, and sometimes she would hold a stranger’s hand. The understandable apprehension and fear she felt might lessen, or increase. Psychologist Jim Coan of the University…

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Charlottesville: How to Heal

BY DR. ROB GAILEY The news coming out of Charlottesville, Va., was disturbing on many levels, but one piece of news made my body tense and my head spin. Reports were coming in that a car had plowed into a group of people who were marching in protest of the neo-Nazi and KKK event organized to assert a cultural supremacy in a nation blessed with vast diversity. As video footage of the car ramming into the crowd made its way online, I watched with horror…

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The Courage to Listen Well

You’re hiking along a shallow stream, green foliage to your left and right, sharp stones pressing through the soles of your boots. You spot a small log, and the urge to sit down takes over. Your legs ache. Just as you sit and toss your cumbersome backpack to the ground you hear something in the nearby brush. The sound, at first soft and muffled, solidifies into steps. You suddenly remember there are mountain lions in the area. You spring up as if called to attention.…

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Adventuresome Civility: The Brave Work of Finding Common Ground

  This season is brimming with questions of who we are to each other — how we should relate to each other in the spaces and time we share. You’ve heard the buzzwords to describe America’s condition — polarized, divided, a widening spectrum. You may have also heard pleas from leaders, or even your own friends and family, for civil discourse. This season is brimming with questions of who we are to each other — how we should relate to each other in the spaces…

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The Logical Approach: Learning to Disagree Agreeably

Imagine a group of friends gathered around a table — eating, talking, and enjoying one another’s company. As these friends discuss life, their conversation turns to politics and they quickly discover they hold different views on particular policy issues. But instead of descending into a heated exchange or changing the subject, the friends begin to respectfully discuss and debate the merits and weaknesses of each position. Although this scenario may seem unlikely in the emotionally charged political climate we are living in today, PLNU’s Speech…

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The Social Media Silo Situation

The year is 2016. The place, Facebook. A 30-something man is scrolling through his newsfeed when he sees the inflammatory headline of a news article bashing the presidential candidate he supports. Angrily, the man glances up to see who posted the article, hesitates momentarily, and then “unfriends” the “friend” he has not seen since high school. Is the man right to remove the offending presence? After all, the article was clearly biased, and discussing politics over social media never changes anyone’s mind, right? Navigating the…

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No Longer Isolated: Art Therapy’s Effect on Older Generations

Many older adults in our society are being diagnosed with psychological brain disorders, such as Alzheimer’s, dementia, and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) — and the number is growing. Many suffering with these illnesses also experience mental health stigma, a fear of being judged or misunderstood, which almost inevitably leads to silence, and even isolation. Over the last decade though, researchers have tried non-traditional therapy methods to assist patients in healing and connecting with others. Art therapy, a form of psychotherapy involving the encouragement of self-expression…

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The Mystery and Power of the Creative Arts

Perhaps most of your experience with the creative arts stems from when you were younger, whether that was learning to play the piano after school, constructing a vibrant collage during art period, or studying British literature in college. Unfortunately, for many of us, that might be our only experience with the artistic world. As we grow older, some of us put aside the easel and metronome and stop participating — both as active creators and observers — in the creative arts. Erwin Raphael McManus, artist, author,…

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How to Mourn with Those Who Mourn

Dr. Reuben Welch, professor emeritus, served as university chaplain from 1968-83. Since then, he has been an integral part of our community, impacting many lives at PLNU and beyond through his classes, pastoral leadership, and genuine friendship. We sat down with him to learn from his years of experience coming alongside those grieving and mourning, and loving them. Q:  When people are in mourning, what might be helpful for them to hear? What might be harmful? A: Familiar words come to mind: “God is good,” “God’s…

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Living with Loss: Walking Through Grief & Mourning

In early July, PLNU alumnus John Mark Slagle (84) was on the phone with his 26-year-old son, Jordan, discussing a speech Jordan had to give for a course at Trinity Western. The speech was to be a reflection on Jordan’s leadership style. Jordan was nervous about giving it and still needed to work some things out. Before ending the call, the two of them agreed to review the speech together the next morning at home. A few hours after John said goodbye to his son…

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Across All Barriers: Choosing Risk & Vulnerability Over Differences

“The world has never been an easy place, but the past decade has been traumatic for so many people that it’s made changes in our culture. From 9/11, multiple wars, and the recession, to catastrophic natural disasters and the increase in random violence and school shootings, we’ve survived and are surviving events that have torn at our sense of safety with such force that we’ve experienced them as trauma even if we weren’t directly involved … “ … Worrying about scarcity is our culture’s version…

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